Archimedes' Principle in the Electric Sea

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Scientific Paper
Title Archimedes\' Principle in the Electric Sea
Author(s) David Tombe
Keywords {{{keywords}}}
Published 2007
Journal General Science Journal
No. of pages 4

Abstract

We examine the cases in which neutral objects experience a force of attraction when they are placed in either a magnetic field both cases is due to the irrotational forces that are acting on the picoscopic scale between the electrons and positrons of the electric sea. The electric sea is a dense sea of rotating electron-positron dipoles. Magnetic lines of force follow the rotation axes of these dipoles whereas electrostatic lines of force follow the direction of linear polarization. Magnetic lines of force will constitute helical springs in which the tension is due to the force of attraction between the electrons and positrons, which will be arranged in a double helix fashion around their mutual rotation axes. Electrostatic lines of force will constitute picoscopic stretched springs in which the restoring force arises from a combination of the inverse square law attraction force and centrifugal repulsion pressure. In both cases is due to the irrotational forces that are acting on the picoscopic scale between the electrons and positrons of the electric sea. The electric sea is a dense sea of rotating electron-positron dipoles. Magnetic lines of force follow the rotation axes of these dipoles whereas electrostatic lines of force follow the direction of linear polarization. Magnetic lines of force will constitute helical springs in which the tension is due to the force of attraction between the electrons and positrons, which will be arranged in a double helix fashion around their mutual rotation axes. Electrostatic lines of force will constitute picoscopic stretched springs in which the restoring force arises from a combination of the inverse square law attraction force and centrifugal repulsion pressure. When a neutral body is immersed in such a pressurized region, it will magnetize or polarize in sympathy. A higher concentration of field lines passing through the immersed neutral body will invoke Archimedes' principle and the body will be attracted towards the region of greater magnetic or electric intensity.

In the diamagnetic case, the concentration of field lines passing through the neutral body will be less than in the surrounding space and so the body will be displaced away from the region of greater magnetic intensity.